UNIT: Rhetorical Approach in Historical Speeches/Student Speech Analysis Portfolio
TIME FRAME: Month-Long Insturctional
TEACHERs/GR: Kathy Saunders and Liz Parsons /AP Language and Composition
Unit Summary and Rationale: Students will self-select historical speeches through choice and control. Students will evaluate, analyze and synthesize information as they present to peers in the creation of a class portfolio. The focus of the activity is to analysis rhetorical strategies in persuasive writing and presentations.

Unit Connection College and Career Ready Descriptions: Teachers will select at least one of the following lenses to act as the overlay for the unit. These descriptors that must be included to ensure the unit is fully aligned to the CCSS and relevant to the college and career ready student.
  • Students will demonstrate independence.
  • Students will value evidence.
  • Students will build strong content knowledge.
  • Students will respond to the varying demands of audience, task, and discipline. Students will critique as well as comprehend.
  • Students will use technology and digital media strategically and capably.
  • Students will develop an understanding of other perspectives and cultures.

Unit Standards:

Reading: Informational Text

Craft and Structure
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and external image arrow-10x10.png the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.5: Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and Collaboration
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Writing

Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Literacy.W.11-12.7Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support external image arrow-10x10.png, reflection, and research.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.9b Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]”).

Language

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.3 external image arrow-10x10.png knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Speaking and Listening

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Technology:

HS.TT.1.3
Use appropriate external image arrow-10x10.png tools to external image arrow-10x10.png and information with others.
Big Ideas: Students will analyze, evaluate and examine rhetorical stance through the examination of historical speeches. In doing so, they will reflect upon their own writing and external image arrow-10x10.png rhetorical strategies in persuasive writing.
Essential Questions:
How are pathos, logos, and ethos used in speech writing?
Which literary devices are most impacting in documents?
How does the author apply rhetorical approach to convey a message?
Knowledge: What should students know by the end of the lesson?
Students will know literary devices and rhetorical strategies. The learner will hold a stronger foundation in the examination of informational text in the context of the historical period and the author's purpose.


Learning Tasks: Teachers list the various tasks students will engage in throughout the unit, include use of media/other forms of information.
Students will be skilled at…
Reading TasksExamination of historical documents in the context of the historical period. Evaluation of author's purpose in conveying a message.
Writing TasksCreation of portfolio document that synthesizes the work of the selected author in the context of the selected speech.Students will incorporate the rhetorical precis into their own writing.
Discussion TasksPresentations will be conducted by students that highlight findings and provoke meaningful consideration of approach through rhetorical devices.
Language/Vocabulary TasksLanguage and vocabulary will be examined by the learner and similar strategies will be employed in the presentation by the same student.

Assessment Evidences:
DIAGNOSTIC
FORMATIVE
SUMMATIVE
Think Pair Share of famous speeches.Speech selections and conferences on graphic organizers to determine comprehension,
external image arrow-10x10.png
, and evaluation skills.

Evaluation of one video speech, "The Danger of a Single Story," an historical poem, "Ballad of Birmingham," varied speeches by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. , President Obama's inaugural speech.
Students will create unique presentations that evaluate self-selected speeches and synthesize the author's approach with the author's perspective.


Peer Editing and Self-Monitoring


Text(s) Selections/Resources (generated by both teacher and student)

See portfolio entries and samples below:

This portfolio is student-selected within the parameters of historical speeches and authors. Students choose presentation dates and formats from the chart below.
"Ballad of Birmingham"
"Letter from Birmingham..."
"Beyond Vietnam" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Well Spoken Presidents.PNG



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"One Day" Inaugaral Poem

Rhetorical Precis

Exemplar:



Feedback on Speech Analysis from AP Language 2012 Exam:


Speech Feedback from AP Readers Part One.PNG
Speech Feedback from AP Readers Part Two.PNG

Speech Feedback from AP Readers Part Three.PNG

Saunders, First Period:

Place your name and title of speech in the space provided. Students in the earlier slots will present first and the order will run in that order. Before you present, you must email your presentation file as a Power Point only. Duplicate speech titles are not allowed by class period unless previously discussed with me.
Name
Speech
Date
Order
Upload as a PP
Alondra Ruiz
George W. Bush- 9/11
October 20
1

Alexander Tricot
Jim Valvano ESPY Speech
October 25
2

Truman Peet
Prince of wales at the illegal wildlife trade conference
October 28
3

Xavier Hooper
FDR Commonwealth Club Speech
November 1
4

Reagan Hiers
Machines Taking Over Jobs
November 3
5

Zachary Harrison
Jim valvanom ESPY Awards Speech
November 10
6

Berit Nilsen
Gender Equality is Your Issue too
November 15
7

Claire Barger
Angelina Jolie acceptance speech
November 17
8

Caitlin Reisdorf
Orlando Shooting
November 22
9

Rebecca Little
Michelle Obama DNC
November 22
10

Mason Baker
Kanye West VMA Speech
November 22
11

Adair Garner
JK Rowling Harvard Commencement Speech
November 30
12

Catherine Buchholtz
Malala's Speech at the Youth Takeover of the UN
December 1
13

Georgia Little
Gender Equality is Your Issue too
December 1
14

Taylor Wilson
I Survived a Terrorist Attack. Here what I Learned.
December 6
15

Alex Caulder
Obama's Speach About Same-Sex Ruling
December 6
16

David Gross
Vincent Lombardi what it takes to be number 1
December 6
17

Charlie Tate
Angelina Jolie World Refugee day 2009
December 8
19

Aya Al-Rufaye
2004 Democratic National Convention Keynote Address
December 14
20

Bailey Perry
The Beauty of What We'll Never Know
December 14
21

Khalique Everett
Bill Clinton 9/11 speech
December 14
22

Liam Gilchrist
Duke Lacrosse Case Speech
December 15
23

Hanna Pass
Chief Joseph, Surrender Speech
December 15
24

Thomas Goodwin
Jim Valvano ESPY speech
December 15
25

Erin Gundersen
Female Superheroes
December 19
26

Laiyah Haley
Why to Talk to Strangers
December 19
27

Tate Furr
Jobs 2006 Stanford Speech
December 19
28

Josie Myers
Peyton Manning Retirement Speech
December 19
29

Walker Martin
KD MVP Acceptance Speech
December 20
30

Will Hornfeck
Stanford Speech
December 20
31




Third Period:

Place your name and title of speech in the space provided. Students in the earlier slots will present first and the order will run in that order. Before you present, you must email your presentation file as a Power Point only the night before by 9 pm. Duplicate speech titles are not allowed by class period unless previously discussed with me.
Name
Speech
Date
Order
Upload as a PP
Flex Day

October 20
1

Jourdan White
This Is How Our Bodies Betray Us In a Lie
October 27
2

Katherine Evans
The Danger of Silence
November 3
5

James Burns
The Third Philippic (Demosthenes)
November 10
6


.
Kiara Wilkerson
History Is A Weapon
November 10
7

Quint Bradford
The Perils of indifference
November 15
8

Noah Beck
Steve Jobs Stanford commencement address 2005
November 17
9

enjamin Skidmore
Without Limits
November 22
11

Ryann Moore
Elie Wiesel "The Perils of Indifference"
November 22
12

Hannah Sisk
President Barack Obama`s Speech on Gun Control
November 30
13

Taylor Henegar
JFK's Berlin Wall Speech
December 1
14

rayson Oxendine
Billy Joel's 1993 Berklee Commencement Speech
December 1
15

Will Casey
Faulkner Acceptance Speech
December 6


Mariana McHenry
Rosa Parks Eulogy
December 6
16

April Turner
Ellen Degeneres Tulane Commencement Speech 2009
December 6
17

Morgan Howland
Gender Equality Is Your Issue Too
December 7
18

Layla Shaw
Michelle Obama 2016 DNC speech
December 7
19

Eleni Hull
How to Raise a Black Son in America
December 8
20

Zakiya Douglas
Bill Clinton Eulogy for Senator Byrd
December 8
21

Emily Burton
Plus Size? More Like My Size
December 14
22

Aiedyn Woods
Kanye West VMAs Speech 2015
December 14
23

Emma Randall
A World At School: Education
December 14
24

Cameron Jacke
Michael Jordan Retirement
December 15
25

Emma Winstead
Obama's Eulogy for Reverend Pickney
December 15
26

Tyler Johnston
Obama Newtown shooting speech
December 15
27

Bryn Covington
Valedictory Exercises 2013: Colbert Speech
December 19
28

Alex Biaggi
FDR First Inaugural Address
December 19
30

Nicholas Yount
The Speed of Outrage
December 20
31

Melody Davis
Why Sit Ye Here and Die?
December 20


Ahmed Wahab
Jesse Williams' BET Award Speech
December 20







Bring on the female superheroes!