AP Language and Composition Syllabus AP English Language QR Code.png

Kathy Saunders, Room 215 Duration: Year-Long Course

Class Wiki: https://saundersapenglishlanguage.wikispaces.com/home

Email: saundek@gcsnc.com



Course Overview

Welcome to AP English Language and Composition. This year-long course, offered to juniors as an introductory-level college class, combines American literature and the study of rhetoric. Students will carefully analyze a broad range of non-fiction prose selections, write several types of essays, develop critical reading and writing skills through daily in-class activities, out-of-class assignments, seminar discussions, conferences with peers about personal essays, and a process approach to all five communication skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Students will experience primarily American literature, both fiction and non-fiction, through thematic units interspersed with diverse genres, which model and teach writing strategies, rhetorical devices, various genres, and stylistic devices. Learners in this course will also engage in collaborative service learning project.

Assessment:

Course Grading Criteria:

Assessments will include written, multiple choice, performance, formal and informal assessments and will be used as an objective measurement of the learning outcome. This allows reflection on what needs to be retaught and/or when curriculum compacting can occur to avoid repetition of mastered material. Assessments will be personalized as self-reflection, student-generated rubrics, group projects to offer assessment capable learners opportunities to thrive. Formative assessments will drive instruction and performance assessments will combine with authentic assessment and learning opportunities to prepare students. Benchmark assessments and partnered reflection/formative planning with drive outcomes. Performance based learning will extend our purpose and enrich the plan which is always to benefit the learner and the learning community. Mondays will be reserved for major tests that require advance preparation by students. Fridays will alternate with authentic AP essays and m/c assessments that will not require advance studying on the part of the student.


The following is a breakdown of scoring by percentage:

Classwork/Homework: 20%

Quizzes 20%

Exams/Projects 30%

Essays: 30%

A: 90-100
B: 80-89
C: 70-79
D: 60-69
NP: 59

Accessing Grades:


Plagiarism Policy:

Students found in the practice of plagiarism will receive a phone call home and a conference with the teacher for remediation. The assignment will not count and will have the option of grade replacement for a new assignment for a grade no higher than a 70 on the first offense. A second offense will involve a grade of zero and an administrative referral.
pla·gia·rism is
  1. the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own.
synonyms:
copying, infringement of copyright, piracy, theft, stealing;

*Homework Policy:

Homework is due at the beginning of the class. Late assignments are accepted; however, they will incur a point deduction

All work is due at the beginning of class. Late work is scored at a 70 and then will incur a 10 point penalty per day. If a quiz/homework has been reviewed in class, the student may be given an alternate assignment.

Homework is given to prepare students for the day’s lesson and/or as an extension of the classroom learning environment. Students/parents have my contact information and are encouraged to contact me with questions regarding the assignment. Attempts are always celebrated.

Late Work: All work is due at the beginning of class;

All work is due at the beginning of class. Late work is scored at a 70 and then will incur a 10 point penalty per day. If a quiz/homework has been reviewed in class, the student may be given an alternate assignment.

Zero Policy: All student work can be re-taken for an adjusted grade when a student has a zero or has a grade below mastery of 80% as the goal is learning at all times. The only exception exists with the plagiarism policy.



Tutoring is offered every Thursday after school in the classroom and upon request; please notify me in advance.


Assessment is done primarily through essays; however, quizzes are given on vocabulary words, daily grades are taken for class assignments, response notebooks will be evaluated periodically; revision of essays is crucial to demonstrate time and effort to improving writing skills. Certain writing assignments will be considered major grades: character sketch, narrative of biographical “light bulb” moment, comparison-contrast of two poets (your choice), argumentative speech on American culture focus, and the argumentative research paper on a contemporary social issue in America.

Assessments will include written, multiple choice, performance, formal and informal assessments and will be used as an objective measurement of the learning outcome. This allows reflection on what needs to be retaught and/or when curriculum compacting can occur to avoid repetition of mastered material. Assessments will be personalized as self-reflection, student-generated rubrics, group projects to offer assessment capable learners opportunities to thrive. Formative assessments will drive instruction and performance assessments will combine with authentic AP assessment and learning opportunities to prepare students. Benchmark assessments and partnered reflection/formative planning with drive outcomes. Performance based learning will extend our purpose and enrich the plan which is always to benefit the learner and the learning community.

1. Reading Strategies: Although the following are only three of many critical reading strategies taught during the semester, these will form a good foundation for rhetorical analysis. These three methods will be taught in the first two weeks, assignments based on in-class and out-of-class reading will employ these reading strategies, and students will be asked to turn several of their analyses into expository compositions, some timed writings in class, others for homework assignments. Students are asked to keep a notebook of each strategy and selection which can later be used for further analysis in compositions. Some of these are given grades to assess whether students are practicing the skills of critical analysis and the depth of their thinking.
  • Double Entry Journals--students divide a sheet of paper down the middle and on the left side note images, details, words, questions, quotes, etc. that they noticed as they are reading; on the right side of the paper, students reflect on their notation, such as, “I noticed the colors are vibrant” or “I wonder why he chose to describe the setting in so much detail?” or “This simile is vivid and rich.”
  • T-Graphs--for comparison of selections of prose/poetry or two essays, etc. Students divide a sheet with a T to set up parallelisms. On the left side, one selection is noted as it is read, and then as the student reads the second selection, notations are paralleled or contrasted to the other.
  • SOAPSTone--used for most of the non-fiction selections assigned. Students are to note the Subject, the Occasion, the Audience, the Purpose, and the Tone of each selection as they read; these notes are kept in notebooks to use in expository essays or to review the reading assignments from time to time.

2. Vocabulary Enrichment Strategies: Students are to hand the week’s words in for a grade and keep in notebook for further enrichment. Students are asked to share randomly selected words and present to the class; students are responsible for keeping a list of the presented words and studying for quizzes given weekly. Students are expected to be able to use the words in context either in sentences or paragraphs. Students will also create visible SAT words for the school.r understanding of roots to unfamiliar words.

3. Writing Strategies and Processes:
Since writing is a process and the skills are built onto and layered, the following is a basic outline of how the stages are broken down into various elements. Although these are artificial and only for the sake of discussing and planning essays, this layered, process approach is used throughout the semester. The stages and skills are later addressed with particular major writing assignments reviewing these essentials (as listed earlier).

  1. Rhetoric Study:
Terms reviewed:
rhetoric, syntax, diction, discourse, explicit, implicit, analogy, figures of speech, lexicon, critical analysis, prose, poetry, satire, genre, metonymy, etc.

  • Sample assignment: Students are asked to keep their own glossary of these terms in their notebooks, adding rhetorical terms as discovered and discussed during the course of study. Quizzes are given to check understanding and students are asked to write good sentences with specific examples to show assimilation of these linguistic terms. Students are expected to use these terms in the expository essays for clarity and focus.

Learning Outcomes

This is a year-long course that will incorporate research and writing requirements.

By the end of this course students should be at a mastery level for the following:

Students will integrate all the language arts skills gained throughout their education. The curriculum both affirms these skills and equips the students to be life-long learners. Students continue to explore expressive, expository, argumentative, and literary contexts. The emphasis in AP English is on argumentation by developing a position of advocacy through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and using media. Students will:

  • Express reflections and reactions to texts.

  • Explain principles inspired by the curriculum.

  • Interpret and qualify texts.

  • Research and address issues of public or personal concern.

  • Create products and presentations which maintain standard conventions of the written and spoken language

Strands: Oral Language, Written Language, and Other Media/Technology

Students in this course will engage in the careful reading and critical analysis of informational, non-fiction, and imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure to their readers. As they read, students should consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.


Grimsley Student Handbook:

CLASSROOM RULES AND EXPECTATIONS:


1- Prompt arrival
2- Prepared, ready to work on time; electronics only with teacher approval
3- Completion of homework and assignments on time/at the beginning of class.
4- Promotion of a positive work climate
5- Use of appropriate language and behavior
6- Respect of yourself, peers, faculty and school property


Supply List:

1- One-inch binder
2- Looseleaf paper
3- Colored pencils
4- Flash/jump drive
5- Highlighters
6- Composition notebook or journal
7- Erasable pens or pencils
Wish list: paper towels, hand sanitizer, Clorox wipes

Sample selections from the following periods:

See Student and Parent Planner for Detail

Shakespearean play for oration: Henry V as a historical perspective

Colonial/Revolutionary Periods
Rhetorical Focus: Persuasion and Causation
Writing Skills Focus: Thesis and Topic Sentence Development
Theme Analysis, Persuasive Piece
The Scarlet Letter –Nathaniel Hawthorne
“To My Dear and Loving Husband” and “Upon the Burning of Our House” –Anne Bradstreet
“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” –Jonathan Edwards
“Speech in the Virginia Convention” –Patrick Henry

Romanticism, Anti-Transcendentalism
Rhetorical Focus: Narration and Description
Writing Skills Focus: Organization and Organizational Patterns, Phrases/Parallelism
Into the Wild-Krakauer
“Self-Reliance” –Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Walden” –Henry David Thoreau
“Civil Disobedience” –Henry David Thoreau
“On Civil Disobedience” –Mahatma Gandhi
“Letter from the Birmingham Jail” –Martin Luther King Jr.
“The Lottery” –Shirley Jackson
“The Life You Save May Be Your Own” –Flannery O’Connor
Whitman and Dickinson poetry

Civil War Era, and Local Color/Expansionism
Naturalism/Industrialization, Modernism, Harlem Renaissance
Rhetorical Focus: Definition
Skill Focus: Development and Support

"The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” –Frederick Douglass
“The Open Boat” –Stephen Crane
Sijourner Truth –Ain't I a Woman
“To Build a Fire” –Jack London
“The Yellow Wallpaper” –Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Poetry by Carl Sandburg, Edgar Lee Masters, E.A. Robinson,
T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Theodore Roethke,
Langston Hughes, and James Weldon Johnson
“How it Feels to Be Colored Me” –Zora Neale Hurston
Poetry by Toni Morrison

Contemporary Lit, Vietnam and Post-Modernism
Rhetorical Focus: Process, Comparison, Satire
Writing Skill Focus: Style
“A Modest Proposal” –Jonathan Swift
Anne Sexton Poetry
“Me Talk Pretty One Day” –David Sedaris
The Things They Carried- Tim O'Brien
Selected Readings
"Black Men in Public Spaces"-Staples
"Myth of the Latin Woman"-Ortiz
"Clan of the One Breasted Women", etc., selected Bedford readings (see below)